8.6
79 votes
This Old House

This Old House

PBS 1979

This Old House celebrates the fusion on old world craftsmanship and modern technology. Each season features two renovation projects. Project One traditionally consists of eighteen or more so episodes and is filmed in Massachusetts. Project Two is taped in a different region of the country to highlight the variety of American architectural styles and renovation issues.

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The 10 Best Episodes of This Old House

This Old House - S11E16

#1 - The Concord House - 16

10.00

Season 11 - Episode 16

Our host takes a side trip to a futuristic show house in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, where plastic is used in novel ways. After Richard Trethewey shows how plastic piping has been laid for the barn's radiant heating system, lightweight concrete is poured on the first floor.

The episode was rated #1 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

This Old House - S34E14

#2 - Cambridge 2012: Secondary Spaces

10.00

Season 34 - Episode 14

Kevin arrives to find Roger finishing up the driveway and the planting. Inside, Norm finds the first floor nearly complete—and very white—except for the small powder room where wallpaper installer Mike Bradshaw is putting up a bold hand-drawn wave pattern made in England. We see his technique for cutting and installing around the new blue vanity. Tom turns his attention to the basement, where he meets homeowner John Stone to help him make a simple DIY workshop with materials from the home center. They make a workbench out of a solid core door and add pegboard for tool storage. Next door to the workshop, the basement hallway and playroom will be more finished than the workshop, to give the kids a place to play. Jamie Gilmore shows Kevin how his team prepped the room by grinding down the high spots of the concrete, sealing the surface against moisture, skimming the surface with concrete, then finally applying the linoleum composition tile. Local glass artist Carrie Gustafson invites Norm into her workshop to see how she translates her background in printmaking and her love of natural, organic forms into magical pieces to hold the light, like the fixture she's making for the entry foyer at our project. On the third floor in the master suite, closet designer Erin Hardy shows Kevin the latest offerings in storage options that blend seamlessly with the modern aesthetic of the house. Back downstairs, at the end of the day, automation expert Doug Schmidt shows Kevin how he's provided wireless control for the battery- powered window shades, the first floor lighting and music. He's also provided an amazingly slim flat screen that pivots on a bracket for easy viewing, or tucking away flush with the wall it sits on.

The episode was rated #2 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

This Old House - S23E10

#3 - The Manchester House - 10

10.00

Season 23 - Episode 10

Steve begins the show in a municipal parking lot in Ipswich, Massachusetts, where once stood a beautiful 250-year-old Georgian home. Later in the show, he takes viewers to the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, where the house - and the lives of the many families that live there - have been recontructed. At the jobsite, mason Lenny Belliveau builds the new addition's exterior face from water-stuck brick, while inside, our master carpenter checks out Dan McLaughin's use of an insulating chimney system made from pumice. It goes up quickly and keeps the chimney stack warmer, preventing the buildup of the column of cold air that normally dumps out, spreading smoke into the room. Tommy shows Steve his method of putting in a wooden floor over concrete that was previously outdoor patio space; his scribing technique is one Steve's never seen before. Finally, architect Steve Holt shows our master carpenter his design for the new fireplace inglenook, based in part of old photos t

The episode was rated #3 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

This Old House - S36E17

#4 - Lexington Project 2015: Part 9: Old to New

10.00

Season 36 - Episode 17

Progress on the mud room and kitchen

The episode was rated #4 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

This Old House - S36E21

#5 - Lexington Project 2015: Part 13: Finishing Details

10.00

Season 36 - Episode 21

New plants are added to the landscaping plan; and a wrought-iron chandelier with 52 bulbs is installed. Also: the radiators being used in the garage and upstairs sitting room; the upstairs laundry room; and the insulated steel garage doors that should help keep the heat inside the garage.

The episode was rated #5 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

This Old House - S23E11

#6 - The Manchester House - 11

10.00

Season 23 - Episode 11

From the shoreline, Steve sees the rapidly improving look of the house, which has now regained its missing wing and dormers, and is starting to have its new front porches put on. Tom and our master carpenter take a progress tour, whose highlights include the new wood roof, tricky roof detailing on the new addition, and a look at the newly dormered third floor. Landscape contractor Roger Cook, landscape architect David Hawk, and homeowner Janet McCue discuss plans for the new landscape, with special consideration given to the idea of changing the size and location of the current driveway. The kitchen design has been finalized, and designer Kevin Finnegan take Steve through a full-size mock-up.

The episode was rated #6 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

This Old House - S35E11

#7 - Arlington 2014: Part 3: Concrete Jungle

10.00

Season 35 - Episode 11

Kevin, Norm, Tom, and mason Mark McCullough replace the substandard foundation by pouring a new slab and curb, all while preserving the antique fieldstone foundation. The crew also finds headroom and original plaster details in the living room.

The episode was rated #7 Best episode of This Old House from 2 votes.

This Old House - S34E11

#8 - Cambridge 2012: Window Seat, Stairs, Knee Walls

10.00

Season 34 - Episode 11

In the side yard, Roger installs two new sets of granite steps to access the old deck. Tom shows Kevin how he's making a new window seat fit into an old bay window. Norm installs the last of the maple stair treads, and creates a custom newel cap out of southern yellow pine. In the master bedroom, Tom shows Kevin how he concealed access doors within the wainscoting for the knee walls. Painting contractor Mauro Henrique use a whitewash stain with a lacquer finish to make our southern yellow pine ceilings look Swedish.

The episode was rated #8 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

This Old House - S15E19

#9 - The Honolulu House - 1

10.00

Season 15 - Episode 19

The guys padde into Honolulu, Hawaii, to begin an eight show series on the renovation and expansion of homeowner Christiane Bintliff's oceanside bungalow, built in the 1930s. The house sits on part of a larger parcel given to her great-great-great-grandfather by Hawaii's King Kamehameha III in return for his services as admiral of the royal navy. Despite the apparement termite damage and out-of-date systems, Chtistiane is determine to save this old-style island home. So our master carpenter goes off to the lonely island of Molokai to see the restoration of Father Damien's church, recently completed by the firm of Ching Construction, and our host visits a stunning renovation of an oceanside home by architect Norm Lacayo. With the team assembled, the jobsite is blessed by Hawaiian minister the Reverend Abraham Akaka.

The episode was rated #9 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

This Old House - S11E17

#10 - The Concord House - 17

10.00

Season 11 - Episode 17

Terra-cotta tiling begins. The crew cases and frames the doors the doors and windows. We then visit a plant in Western Massachusetts where shingles and other asphalt products are recycled to make paving material that will be used on the driveway of the Concord barn.

The episode was rated #10 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

#11 - Barrington; Wall Dressing
10.00
Season 33 - Episode 24

Retractable awning; Saratoga soapstone; light fixtures; electric floor warming system.

The episode was rated #1 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

#12 - The Concord House - 17
10.00
Season 11 - Episode 17

Terra-cotta tiling begins. The crew cases and frames the doors the doors and windows. We then visit a plant in Western Massachusetts where shingles and other asphalt products are recycled to make paving material that will be used on the driveway of the Concord barn.

The episode was rated #2 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

#13 - Cambridge 2012: Window Seat, Stairs, Knee Walls
10.00
Season 34 - Episode 11

In the side yard, Roger installs two new sets of granite steps to access the old deck. Tom shows Kevin how he's making a new window seat fit into an old bay window. Norm installs the last of the maple stair treads, and creates a custom newel cap out of southern yellow pine. In the master bedroom, Tom shows Kevin how he concealed access doors within the wainscoting for the knee walls. Painting contractor Mauro Henrique use a whitewash stain with a lacquer finish to make our southern yellow pine ceilings look Swedish.

The episode was rated #3 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

#14 - Arlington 2014: Part 8: Italianate Inspiration
10.00
Season 35 - Episode 16

Exterior colors are proposed. A tour of a nearby 1870 Italianate style home. Richard shows a more attractive approach to PVC vents. Tom shows his favorite applications for radiant heat.

The episode was rated #4 Best episode of This Old House from 2 votes.

#15 - The Honolulu House - 1
10.00
Season 15 - Episode 19

The guys padde into Honolulu, Hawaii, to begin an eight show series on the renovation and expansion of homeowner Christiane Bintliff's oceanside bungalow, built in the 1930s. The house sits on part of a larger parcel given to her great-great-great-grandfather by Hawaii's King Kamehameha III in return for his services as admiral of the royal navy. Despite the apparement termite damage and out-of-date systems, Chtistiane is determine to save this old-style island home. So our master carpenter goes off to the lonely island of Molokai to see the restoration of Father Damien's church, recently completed by the firm of Ching Construction, and our host visits a stunning renovation of an oceanside home by architect Norm Lacayo. With the team assembled, the jobsite is blessed by Hawaiian minister the Reverend Abraham Akaka.

The episode was rated #5 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

#16 - The Manchester House - 11
10.00
Season 23 - Episode 11

From the shoreline, Steve sees the rapidly improving look of the house, which has now regained its missing wing and dormers, and is starting to have its new front porches put on. Tom and our master carpenter take a progress tour, whose highlights include the new wood roof, tricky roof detailing on the new addition, and a look at the newly dormered third floor. Landscape contractor Roger Cook, landscape architect David Hawk, and homeowner Janet McCue discuss plans for the new landscape, with special consideration given to the idea of changing the size and location of the current driveway. The kitchen design has been finalized, and designer Kevin Finnegan take Steve through a full-size mock-up.

The episode was rated #6 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

#17 - Lexington Project 2015: Part 13: Finishing Details
10.00
Season 36 - Episode 21

New plants are added to the landscaping plan; and a wrought-iron chandelier with 52 bulbs is installed. Also: the radiators being used in the garage and upstairs sitting room; the upstairs laundry room; and the insulated steel garage doors that should help keep the heat inside the garage.

The episode was rated #7 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

#18 - The Manchester House - 10
10.00
Season 23 - Episode 10

Steve begins the show in a municipal parking lot in Ipswich, Massachusetts, where once stood a beautiful 250-year-old Georgian home. Later in the show, he takes viewers to the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, where the house - and the lives of the many families that live there - have been recontructed. At the jobsite, mason Lenny Belliveau builds the new addition's exterior face from water-stuck brick, while inside, our master carpenter checks out Dan McLaughin's use of an insulating chimney system made from pumice. It goes up quickly and keeps the chimney stack warmer, preventing the buildup of the column of cold air that normally dumps out, spreading smoke into the room. Tommy shows Steve his method of putting in a wooden floor over concrete that was previously outdoor patio space; his scribing technique is one Steve's never seen before. Finally, architect Steve Holt shows our master carpenter his design for the new fireplace inglenook, based in part of old photos t

The episode was rated #8 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

#19 - Arlington 2014: Part 3: Concrete Jungle
10.00
Season 35 - Episode 11

Kevin, Norm, Tom, and mason Mark McCullough replace the substandard foundation by pouring a new slab and curb, all while preserving the antique fieldstone foundation. The crew also finds headroom and original plaster details in the living room.

The episode was rated #9 Best episode of This Old House from 2 votes.

#20 - Arlington 2014: Part 16: Decorative Details
10.00
Season 35 - Episode 24

A teak island top is installed in the kitchen; a vanity top is added to the master bath; an electronics nook is built; the pebble tiles on the shower floor are grouted; handmade wallpaper is hung; and a new front door is installed.

The episode was rated #10 Best episode of This Old House from 1 votes.

Last updated: feb 22, 2021

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